Notions of a baby life in Paris

It has been now three months and two weeks of a hectic baby life in Paris. Time for a recap.

  • It is easy to lose those few pregnancy kilos as you live in the fifth floor without an elevator. Just try to climb five floors with a baby, a stroller carry cot and the groceries.
  • You are likely to be a relaxed mom, once the baby drops his pacifier on the floor in the hall on your way out, you certainly don’t climb back to the 5th to wash it. (Note to self: Carry a bottle of water with you)
  • Parisian grannies love babies, they might even attack the stroller or the baby carrier, so be aware (I have heard this applies to some Asian tourists too). My favorite was the granny who told me to enjoy my time with the baby since when he grows up “il va te faire chier“, he will piss you off. Thanks for the tip, lady.
  • All french women seem to have the same manner and tone while talking to babies, it’s kind of cute. Ça va mon coeur / Au revoir petit crapaud… tui tui tui
  • Instead of believing in all things baby led (sleeping, eating), the French believe in all things parent led. If parents are happy, then baby is too. I try to tell this to my three month old, but he has hard time understanding it.
  • Literally everyone, including a guy at the Orly airport passport control desk, are asking if the baby “fait ses nuits“, sleeps through the night. They are obsessed about this. Well he did sleep through quite a few nights before the three months’ growth spurt, sleep regression and whatsoever. They should see the dark circles around my eyes and know better not to ask.
  • When out and about with the baby, and also while pregnant, you are prioritaire. This means that you can basically skip most of the queues and avoid waiting for your turn in line. This comes in very handy in Primark on a Saturday afternoon or in the airport taxi stop late at night. Muahahahaha, some compensation for those sleepless nights.
  • People treat you as a champion and congratulate you when you are still breastfeeding your three month old. It’s nice to be good at something!
  • French social security pays most part of your pelvic floor and abdominal reeducation sessions. Luckily I had my baby before Macron gets to cancel this policy.
  • If the baby refuses to take a nap at home, he is likely to fall asleep quickly in Paris metro, that strange little creature.
  • If you have a horrible day and the baby is only taking 20 minute naps, you can always use half of those 20 minutes to take a petit verre de rouge in a local brasserie on your way home from park. This naturally only when chocolate does not help.

All in all, baby life in Paris is not too bad at all, but the next chapter will take place in banlieu.

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